Willingboro

Willingboro, NJ runs along the North Bank of the Rancocas Creek, Main Stem. Creek Miles 22.5 – 26.4. In 4 miles you paddle through 400 years of maritime and community heritage.

Before the 17th century, Willingboro was home to Lenape Indians. Around 1680 Thomas Olive had settled a water powered mill on what is now, today Mill Creek, Willingboro. In 1700 Wellingbourgh (note old spelling) was one of the 11 original municipalities in Burlington County.

In 1810 Joseph Lundy, moved from Sussex County, NJ, near Allamuchy Mountain State Park, down the Musconetcong River to the Delaware River. Heading South he reached the head of tide at the Trenton Falls. Following the tide he also settled in Willingboro.

Remains of ferry landings, old piers, wharfs and the tug and barge graveyard downstream of Mill Creek and Coates Bar attest to the Rancocas Creek in Willingboro was a maritime and regional market corridor. Check out the Willingboro Public Library for All sorts of facts and features of Willingboro‘s Heritage and History.

Note Along the Creek Front 4 different landings in Willingboro, proper. Willingboro’s Dunk’s Ferry was integral to George Washington’s Victory at Trenton. 8 up-stream creek miles sits Mt. Holly. The head of navigation and Revolutionary War skirmishes. Naturally.

Willingboro (note all school spelling) welcomed (starting around 1840’s and up into the 1920’s) steam powered vessels moved folks and freight between Willingboro and other local Rancocas Creek Communities and the Port City of Camden. Coates Bar was found off the entrance to Mill Creek. It was removed in and around 1888, leaving behind a wonderful shallow tidal waterway.

Today Mill Creek is a haven for multi-use activities and motor boat traffic. Willingboro’s Creek Front Also is a Haven For Wildlife, Culture, Heritage and Multi-Use Recreation.

Tip of the Hat Thanks to M. Cacastagner of Willingboro for his Seal Photo. Tip of the Hat Thanks to Keven Lee from Timbuctoo Canoe and Kayak’s for his Bald Eagle Photo.

Rancocas Pathways: Where a rising tide lifts all boats….and boots *

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